University of Texas receives $15m grant to study brain injuries

Brain injury research is back in the news, though the truth is probably that it never really left. The topic is a hot one because doctors are constantly finding new victims of brain injuries with causes that are outside of the box of typical accidents or slip and falls.

Traumatic brain injuries or TBI can be extremely serious, with life-altering effects on the person suffering, and their friends and family. Brain injury attorneys at Kirkendall Dwyer LLP, know that TBIs can include cerebral hemorrhage, concussions, contusions, intercranial hemorrhage and skull fractures. The severity of the injury can depend on a variety of factors.

Now researchers from the state health department and UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas will partner on a $15 million grant program to better diagnose and treat brain injuries. The Texas Institute for Brain Injury and Repair is a brand new effort that will focus on three key areas: brain imaging, science/clinical research and education and prevention strategies.

The conversation about TBIs, primarily concussions, center more these days around sports such as football, boxing and even soccer. Any activity where the head is likely to be struck, has potential for multiple concussions with multiple adverse effects. Researchers have also been targeting awareness of military service members about TBIs from combat.

Statistics show that about 3.8 million people in the country are affected by sports-related concussions each year. Concerns about sports include how juveniles who play the games are affected and what the long term impact of repeated brain injuries could be. The initiative will have a campaign that targets teens and a website is scheduled to be launched late this summer.

If you or a loved one has suffered a brain injury and don’t know what to do next, contact brain injury attorneys at Kirkendall Dwyer LLP.

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